The Pole Always Wins

     According to the North American Wood Pole Coalition (“NAMPC”) the U.S. currently has 110 million utility poles approximately in use. The U.S. transportation system is the largest in the world – comprising some 3.9 million miles of public roads, enough to circle the globe more than 157 times. Utility poles are required at all such roadways, including the 5000 public-use airports, the 145 major seaports and all private sector developments. This creates a fundamental need to redesign and relocate poles away from the traffic flow.

     Car to pole impacts account for a large proportion of car occupant casualties. In North America, thousands of fatalities occur with a 1000% increase in serious injuries, and an estimated 1000% increase in costs each year. Road safety organizations countermeasure by moving the utility poles away from the roadside. To reduce the risk of injury there is a need to change the properties and location of the pole, so to stop the car while retaining structural integrity.

     Steel cantilever poles are becoming a more prevalent genre utilized in traffic, generic lighting, homeland security and smart pole structures. The second common of the steel pole genres, utility poles, are grouped into two types; utility transmission and utility distribution. Both genres of poles are engineer designed by the same structural standards and principals, but they differ in governing codes and common industry practice. Steel poles have uniform material strength throughout the entire structure providing consistent and calculable results.

     With driver and pedestrian safety considered paramount, the unique attributes of steel cantilever pole designs give engineer’s flexibility to create poles that meet load requirements, industry standards and safety expectations. Steel can be fabricated and fastened into an infinite array of engineered structures that meet an expectation for efficiently and aesthetic appeal. Cantilever construction allows overhanging structures without the need for external bracing, which contrasts to constructions supported at both ends with loads applied between the supports.

     About 20 percent of motor vehicle crash deaths result from a vehicle leaving the roadway and hitting a fixed object alongside the road. Trees, utility poles, and traffic barriers are the most common objects struck. Almost half of the deaths in fixed object crashes occur at night and alcohol is a frequent contributing factor. Motorists also run off the road because of excessive speeds, falling asleep, inattention or poor visibility. Efforts to reduce these driver errors are only somewhat effective, so it’s important to remove fixed objects or avoid putting them along roads in the first place if feasible, especially on roads where vehicles are more likely to leave the pavement. Less preferred options include using breakaway objects, shielding objects and increasing the visibility of objects.

⁵Also, steel poles provide safety when impacted by a vehicle. While wood poles tend to shear, steel poles will typically bend when impacted, keeping energized lines upright and away from the vehicle.

     Side impact pole/tree crashes can have devastating consequences. A series of 53 ₆CIREN cases of narrow-object side impacts were analyzed. Twenty-seven of 53 had serious chest injury and 27 had serious head injury. Unilateral chest trauma led to the examination of residual crush patterns that often-demonstrated oblique door intrusion into the occupant’s thorax space. It was hypothesized that unilateral chest trauma was caused by antero-lateral chest loading. This hypothesis was evaluated by conducting two PMHS and ES2 vehicle side impact tests into a rigid pole. The PMHS test produced an oblique chest deformation pattern with injuries very similar to the real-world trauma: unilateral rib fractures, spleen laceration, pelvic fracture, and a basilar skull fracture. Narrow-object side impacts are severe crash environments that can induce oblique chest loading and unique head trauma. Because the human may be more vulnerable in this type of crash scenario, dummy response and measurements, as well as re-examination of side injury criteria may be necessary to design appropriate injury-mitigating safety devices.

     Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), which became operational in 1975, contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes within the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a non-motorist within 30 days of the crash.

     National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has a cooperative agreement with an agency in each state’s government to provide information on all qualifying fatal crashes in the state. These agreements are managed by Regional Contracting Officer’s Technical Representatives located in the 10 NHTSA Regional Offices. Trained state employees, called “FARS Analysts,” are responsible for gathering, translating, and transmitting their state’s data to the National Center for Statistics and Analysis (NCSA) in a standard format. The number of analysts varies by state, depending on the number of fatal crashes and the ease of obtaining data.

FARS data are obtained solely from the state’s existing documents:

Police accident reports
State vehicle registration files
State driver licensing files
State highway department data
Vital statistics
Death certificates
Coroner/medical examiner reports
Hospital medical reports
Emergency medical service reports
Other state records

     A total of 7,964 people died in fixed-object crashes in 2016, 3 percent more than in 2015 and 25 percent fewer than in 1979. The proportion of motor vehicle crash deaths involving collisions with fixed objects has remained between 19 and 23 percent since 1979.

     Thirty-nine percent of drivers killed in fixed-object crashes in 2016 had blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) at or above 0.08 percent. By comparison, 23 percent of drivers killed in other types of fatal crashes had BACs this high. The percentage of drivers killed in fixed-object crashes with BACs at or above 0.08 percent declined from 66 percent in 1982 to 39 percent in 2016, a reduction of 41 percent.

Sources and citations

₁Studies have found crashes decrease in relation to the distance between the pavement edge and the pole (Zegeer, Parker, Cynecki, 1984)

²Relocate poles along corridor farther from roadway and/or to less vulnerable locations – Increasing distance from pavement edge to pole • Poles at curbs, three times more likely to be struck than at 10 ft. (Mak & Mason, 1980)

₃National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic safety facts: A compilation of motor vehicle crash data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System. Available at http://wwwnrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Cats/listpublications.aspx?Id=E&ShowBy=DocType.

₄NCSA DATA RESOURCE WEBSITE FATALITY ANALYSIS REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS) ENCYCLOPEDIA

https://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

There are a very good steel pole manufacturers in the United states with extensive skill set and experience. The technology is changing the online availability of geography

⁵American Iron and Steel Institute

https://one.nhtsa.gov/Research/Crash-Injury-Research-(CIREN)

https://www.pubfacts.com/detail/18184505/Injury-patterns-in-side-pole-crashes

The Pole Always Wins

     According to the North American Wood Pole Coalition (“NAMPC”) the U.S. currently has 110 million utility poles approximately in use. The U.S. transportation system is the largest in the world – comprising some 3.9 million miles of public roads, enough to circle the globe more than 157 times. Utility poles are required at all such roadways, including the 5000 public-use airports, the 145 major seaports and all private sector developments. This creates a fundamental need to redesign and relocate poles away from the traffic flow.

     Car to pole impacts account for a large proportion of car occupant casualties. In North America, thousands of fatalities occur with a 1000% increase in serious injuries, and an estimated 1000% increase in costs each year. Road safety organizations countermeasure by moving the utility poles away from the roadside. To reduce the risk of injury there is a need to change the properties and location of the pole, so to stop the car while retaining structural integrity.

     Steel cantilever poles are becoming a more prevalent genre utilized in traffic, generic lighting, homeland security and smart pole structures. The second common of the steel pole genres, utility poles, are grouped into two types; utility transmission and utility distribution. Both genres of poles are engineer designed by the same structural standards and principals, but they differ in governing codes and common industry practice. Steel poles have uniform material strength throughout the entire structure providing consistent and calculable results.

     With driver and pedestrian safety considered paramount, the unique attributes of steel cantilever pole designs give engineer’s flexibility to create poles that meet load requirements, industry standards and safety expectations. Steel can be fabricated and fastened into an infinite array of engineered structures that meet an expectation for efficiently and aesthetic appeal. Cantilever construction allows overhanging structures without the need for external bracing, which contrasts to constructions supported at both ends with loads applied between the supports.

     About 20 percent of motor vehicle crash deaths result from a vehicle leaving the roadway and hitting a fixed object alongside the road. Trees, utility poles, and traffic barriers are the most common objects struck. Almost half of the deaths in fixed object crashes occur at night and alcohol is a frequent contributing factor. Motorists also run off the road because of excessive speeds, falling asleep, inattention or poor visibility. Efforts to reduce these driver errors are only somewhat effective, so it’s important to remove fixed objects or avoid putting them along roads in the first place if feasible, especially on roads where vehicles are more likely to leave the pavement. Less preferred options include using breakaway objects, shielding objects and increasing the visibility of objects.

⁵Also, steel poles provide safety when impacted by a vehicle. While wood poles tend to shear, steel poles will typically bend when impacted, keeping energized lines upright and away from the vehicle.

     Side impact pole/tree crashes can have devastating consequences. A series of 53 ₆CIREN cases of narrow-object side impacts were analyzed. Twenty-seven of 53 had serious chest injury and 27 had serious head injury. Unilateral chest trauma led to the examination of residual crush patterns that often-demonstrated oblique door intrusion into the occupant’s thorax space. It was hypothesized that unilateral chest trauma was caused by antero-lateral chest loading. This hypothesis was evaluated by conducting two PMHS and ES2 vehicle side impact tests into a rigid pole. The PMHS test produced an oblique chest deformation pattern with injuries very similar to the real-world trauma: unilateral rib fractures, spleen laceration, pelvic fracture, and a basilar skull fracture. Narrow-object side impacts are severe crash environments that can induce oblique chest loading and unique head trauma. Because the human may be more vulnerable in this type of crash scenario, dummy response and measurements, as well as re-examination of side injury criteria may be necessary to design appropriate injury-mitigating safety devices.

     Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), which became operational in 1975, contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes within the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a non-motorist within 30 days of the crash.

     National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has a cooperative agreement with an agency in each state’s government to provide information on all qualifying fatal crashes in the state. These agreements are managed by Regional Contracting Officer’s Technical Representatives located in the 10 NHTSA Regional Offices. Trained state employees, called “FARS Analysts,” are responsible for gathering, translating, and transmitting their state’s data to the National Center for Statistics and Analysis (NCSA) in a standard format. The number of analysts varies by state, depending on the number of fatal crashes and the ease of obtaining data.

FARS data are obtained solely from the state’s existing documents:

Police accident reports
State vehicle registration files
State driver licensing files
State highway department data
Vital statistics
Death certificates
Coroner/medical examiner reports
Hospital medical reports
Emergency medical service reports
Other state records

     A total of 7,964 people died in fixed-object crashes in 2016, 3 percent more than in 2015 and 25 percent fewer than in 1979. The proportion of motor vehicle crash deaths involving collisions with fixed objects has remained between 19 and 23 percent since 1979.

     Thirty-nine percent of drivers killed in fixed-object crashes in 2016 had blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) at or above 0.08 percent. By comparison, 23 percent of drivers killed in other types of fatal crashes had BACs this high. The percentage of drivers killed in fixed-object crashes with BACs at or above 0.08 percent declined from 66 percent in 1982 to 39 percent in 2016, a reduction of 41 percent.

Sources and citations

₁Studies have found crashes decrease in relation to the distance between the pavement edge and the pole (Zegeer, Parker, Cynecki, 1984)

²Relocate poles along corridor farther from roadway and/or to less vulnerable locations – Increasing distance from pavement edge to pole • Poles at curbs, three times more likely to be struck than at 10 ft. (Mak & Mason, 1980)

₃National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic safety facts: A compilation of motor vehicle crash data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System. Available at http://wwwnrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Cats/listpublications.aspx?Id=E&ShowBy=DocType.

₄NCSA DATA RESOURCE WEBSITE FATALITY ANALYSIS REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS) ENCYCLOPEDIA

https://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

There are a very good steel pole manufacturers in the United states with extensive skill set and experience. The technology is changing the online availability of geography

⁵American Iron and Steel Institute

https://one.nhtsa.gov/Research/Crash-Injury-Research-(CIREN)

https://www.pubfacts.com/detail/18184505/Injury-patterns-in-side-pole-crashes

2571 Center Road
Hinckley, Ohio 44233
Phone: 1 888 POLES-01
Fax: 1 844 POLES-33